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Master Chief's TV Actor Expected Fans To Push Back

"Halo," in its hay day, was a record-breaking powerhouse in the gaming industry, but after Bungie passed the franchise over to 343 Industries in 2007, the series struggled to find its footing. However, the "Halo" series recently experienced something of a revival via a television show produced by Paramount Pictures titled "Halo," released back in March of 2022. Although, shortly after its release, it became obvious that not everyone was a fan of this new television show.

Specifically, many long-time fans criticized the TV show for taking considerable creative liberties when adapting the video series to television. For example, in the television show, Master Chief is forced to reconcile with childhood trauma, leaving him questioning his very identity. This starkly contrasts with the stone-faced super soldier in the video games. In addition, the television show features a helmetless Master Chief for much of its runtime, something the games shied away from. This demystification of the "Halo" series' protagonist disappointed fans, leading many to dislike the new Master Chief altogether. Now, Master Chief's actor, Pablo Schreiber, has explained that this was the show's intention all along.

This isn't the video game's Master Chief

In an interview with SFX Magazine, first reported by GamesRadar, Master Chief actor Pablo Schreiber addressed some of the criticism directed at the TV show's Master Chief. Specifically, Schrieber stated that Master Chief was presented in a way to distinguish the character from the games' Master Chief deliberately. "The process of the first season was kind of breaking that relationship that people had with Chief," Schreiber explained. Master Chief has existed for over 20 years in pop culture, so Paramount Pictures likely felt it needed to show viewers that this isn't the same Master Chief present in the games.

Additionally, Schreiber said, "We knew going into it that it was going to be a slightly uncomfortable experience for many viewers because of how long they've lived with this paradigm of Chief." Schreiber also explained that the discomfort experienced by fans in the first season is the start of a long-term relationship between fans and Master Chief that will culminate in a big payoff. Much of what Schreiber said makes sense when comparing television to video games. Although having a protagonist mostly devoid of emotions, with no room for character growth, could work for video games, it doesn't make sense for a potentially long-running television show. Based on what Schreiber said, Master Chief will continue to evolve in Season 2 of "Halo."