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This Fan Made A Nintendo Gaming PC

To this day, the Nintendo GameCube stands as one of the most beloved consoles of all time. Famous for its compact size and the best-selling games it offered, it remains a favorite in the hearts of console gamers everywhere. Now, twenty years later, PC gaming has come to the cube-shaped console, all thanks to one hardware fanatic.

That's right; Reddit user Cityle has created a GameCube that could play PC games. They shared all the specs for the build, including a Ryzen 4500U CPU, 16GB DDR4 RAM HyperX, and Nvidia GTX 1650 graphics card (GPU). The star of the show, however, is the Asus Mini PC PN50 they fit into the compact console box. Cityle has also incorporated the GameCube's opening top as a vent to use with a fan, too.

As a result, this GameCube can play PC games such as "Grand Theft Online" at a reasonable rate. Cityle posted their achievement on Reddit with pictures of the outside and inside, and answered questions from fellow fans.

Cityle has detailed the process of building the GameCube PC over several months on the Level1Techs forums, offering more pictures of the console through each step leading to the finished product. Instead of the typical silver, black, or purple shell of the original GameCube models, Cityle painted the outside a terracotta color. They have apparently used the same color for custom joycons.

That I/O, though

Fellow hardware fans especially praised his neat I/O panel (a.k.a where everything plugs in). His modified GameCube features multiple other ports for HDMI and such like a modern PC, so he had to cut out sections of the shell for each of them. Apparently, Cityle used the I/O shield of the PN50 to trace the cutouts and smoothed the edges with files toward the end. Then, he patched any mistakes with some putty. While Cityle replaced the back of the console, he left the front the same, so it's still GameCube controller compatible. Plugging in a USB adapter apparently allows users to play the console with a mouse.

In addition to their GameCube PC, Cityle has also announced plans to modify a Sega Dreamcast into a PC. However, it seems that project is on hold

Cityle's story is only one example of the creativity of hardware-savvy Nintendo fans. Previously, one fan enabled the Game Boy Micro to play PlayStation 5 games using an HDMI cable, while another created an adapter and desktop client that allowed Game Boys to play online multiplayer "Tetris."